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Eating For Strength-Part 2

 

Greetings! Welcome to the second class in our series, Eating For Strength. Today we shall look at some foods which contain plentiful amounts of protein. In addition, we shall learn about how much protein the body needs.


Soy Bean Flour

Soy bean flour contains twice as much protein as meat, and its protein is complete, and it one of the cheapest source of protein. These beans have been almost the sole source of protein for the Chinese race for a hundred generations.

Proteins are much more plentiful in common foods than most people understand. Herewith is a list of foods which will be very enlightening. 

GRAMS OF PROTEIN CONTAINED IN FOODS

Almonds, salted, 10 to 12 nuts………………3.0

Almonds, chopped, 1 cup………………….18.00

Apple, fresh 1 large……………………………0.75

Applesauce, 3/8 cup…………………………..0.25

Apricots, dried, 9 halves……………………..1.75

Apricots, fresh, 5 apricots…………………….2.0

Asparagus, fresh, 20 large stalks 8 in…….8.0

Avocado pear, 1 medium……………………..2.5

Bananas, 1 medium…………………………….1.2

Beans, dried lima, one sixth cup……………5.2

Beans, dried soy, 1 3/4 T………………………8.0

Beans, string, 2 1/3 cups………………………5.5

Beets, 2/3 cup……………………………………..2.0

Beet greens, cooked, 2 1/4 cups……………4.0

Blackberries, fresh, 1/2 cup…………………..2.2

Bran, unwashed, 1 cup…………………………4.5

Brazil nuts, shelled, 2 nuts…………………….2.5

Carrots, chopped, 1 2/3………………………..2.4

Cauliflower, 1 small head……………………..5.7

Celery, chopped, 4 cups…………………..,…6.0

Corn, 1/2 cup……………………………………..3.0

Corn meal, uncooked,1 cup………………..13.0

Cranberries, 2 cups……………………………0.75

Currants, dried, 1 cup………………………….4.0

Dates, stoned, 1 cup…………………………..4.0

Figs, dried, 1/2 large…………………………1.25

Grapefruit, 1/2 large………………………….1.75

Grapes, Malaga, 20 to 25……………………1.2

Honey, 1 T………………………………………..0.2

Lemons, 3 large………………………………..2.2

Lentils, dried, 2 1/2 T…………………………7.2

Lettuce, 2 large heads………………………6.2

Milk, Soy bean…………………………………8.5

Oats, rolled, cooked, 1/2 cup…………….4.0

Okra, 5 to 6 pods, small………………….0.75

Olives, ripe, 5………………………………….0.4

Onions, 3 to 4 medium…………………….3.0

Peanut butter, 1 T………………………….4.75

Peas, 1/2 cup…………………………………7.0

Peas, split dried, 1 cup………………….47.0

Pecans, 8……………………………………..1.5

Potatoes, baked, Irish, 1 med………….2.7

Prunes, 4 med…………………………….0.75

Radishes, 1 dozen red…………………..1.5

Spinach, cooked, 1 cup…………………1.2

Strawberries, fresh, 1 1/3 cups……….2.5

Tomatoes, canned, 1 cup………………3.0

Turnip greens, cooked, 2 1/2 cups….9.0

Walnuts, 3…………………………………..2.6

Watercress, 5 small bunches…………3.0

Flour, whole wheat, sifted 1 cup……15.0

 

The average percentages of protein contained in dried fruits and vegetables are given as follows:

Alfalfa, with water………………………………………..18.00 Apples…………………………………………………………..2.60 Apricots………………………………………………………..8.70 Artichokes…………………………………………………….9.00 Asparagus……………………………………………………28.80 Barley………………………………………………………….12.70 Beets……………………………………………………………12.80 Blackberries…………………………………………………..8.80

Brussels Sprouts………………………………………….23.80 Cherries…………………………………………………………5.00 Carrots…………………………………………………………..7.70 Cauliflower……………………………………………………27.70 Celery……………………………………………………………20.00 Corn………………………………………………………………11.20 Cucumbers……………………………………………………27.30 Dandelions……………………………………………………20.00 Eggplant………………………………………………………..17.00 Figs………………………………………………………………….7.40 Garlic…………………………………………………………….19.00 Grapes…………………………………………………………….6.00

Green Corn……………………………………………………12.60 Huckleberries………………………………………………….3.70 Kohlrabi………………………………………………………..35.00 Leeks……………………………………………………………22.60 Lettuce…………………………………………………………24.50 Olives…………………………………………………………….7.50 Oranges………………………………………………………..6.10 Oats……………………………………………………………..11.90 Onions………………………………………………………….12.90 Okra……………………………………………………………..15.80 Pears………………………………………………………………4.00 Prunes…………………………………………………………….4.40 Plums……………………………………………………………..4.70 Pineapples……………………………………………………..4.80 Peaches………………………………………………………….6.60 Potatoes………………………………………………………..8.00 Pumpkins…………………………………………………….11.00 Parsnips………………………………………………………..9.00 Raspberries…………………………………………………..7.00

Raspberries, black……………………………………….10.00 Rice……………………………………………………………….9.00 Rutabaga………………………………………………………12.00 Radishes……………………………………………………….14.70 Rye………………………………………………………………..13.50

Savoy cabbage………………………………………………26.00 Spinach…………………………………………………………30.00

Swiss Chard…………………………………………………..20.40 Tomatoes……………………………………………………..15.80 Turnips…………………………………………………………35.00

Wheat, whole………………………………………………..15.70

These foods present the primary sources of proteins. From this list it becomes perfectly apparent that there is no need for eating the flesh of animals in order to secure an adequate protein ration.

A Day’s Supply of Protein

What is a day’s supply of protein and how may one know that he secures enough and no more? It should be understood that muscular activity results in very little wearing away of the tissue so that only small amounts are needed for repair. An excess is injurious.

‘One of the lessons derived from the war was demonstration of the fact that throughout the whole civilized world there was an excessive consumption of meat, especially in Great Britain. Studies of Taylor, Benedict, Roth, Lusk, Sherman, and others—especially those of Sherman, since the war–have shown that the protein requirement is far lower than even Chittenden maintained many years ago.’

‘At a meeting of the interallied Council of Physiologists during the war it was decided that meat was not a physiological necessity. The following statement was made: ‘It is not though desirable to fix minimum meat ration, in view of the fact that no absolute physiological need exists for meat, since the proteins meat can be replaced by other proteins’ ‘

‘There is  no danger of protein deficiency except in poverty or famine, and in diseases preventing eating, or absorption of food from the digestive tract.’

‘Reliable human experience have shown a necessity of not over forty grams of protein a day for a man of 154 pounds weight, even though 60 grams may be taken without harm, and be a safer rule. Kok and Klein, of Warsaw, kept two adults (man and woman) in protein equilibrium and in good health for a period of 167 days on a diet the protein of which was dried solely from the potato. The protein intake for the man was 35.6 grams daily, and for the woman 23.7 grams daily.’

When considering the amount of protein needed one should know that when the total diet contains the right proportion of alkaline foods he does not need as much protein as formerly because the abundance of alkalies causes a saving of protein so that a smaller amount of protein will accomplish as much work now as the larger amount formerly did when the ration was too strongly acid-forming. For this reason the vegetarian needs less protein than those who eat animal foods. This is a very important point. Following is a scientific report on this point:

‘A big excess of bases in the organisms as well as in the food is a necessary precondition for an optional utilization of protein.’ ‘Therefore, a real minimum for protein requirement can be found only when there exists an excess of bases in the organism as well as in the food.’

‘With the increases of the excess of acids in the food as well as in the organism itself the nitrogen requirement mounts uninterruptedly until finally the physiological impossibility of an immediate excretion of the by-products through the kidneys prevents a further rise and produces the illusion of a storage.’ Furthermore, it is clear that a ration relatively low in protein is correct and that meat is not necessary as a protein source.

The Spirit of Prophecy sheds light on this point in the following quotes:

“Some fall into the error that because they discard meat, they do not need to supply its place with the best fruits and vegetables, prepared in their most natural state, free from grease and spices.” CDF             399

“Meat is not essential for health or strength, else the Lord made a mistake when He provided food for Adam and Eve before their fall. All the elements of nutrition are contained in the fruits, vegetables, and grains.” CDF  395

Parents can secure small homes in the country, with land for cultivation, where they can have orchards and where they can raise vegetables and small fruits to take the place of flesh meat; which is so corrupting to the life-blood coursing through the veins.” CDF 400

“It is a mistake to suppose that muscular strength depends on the use of animal food….The grains, with fruits, nuts, and vegetables contain all the nutritive properties necessary to make good blood.” CDF  396

“There must be other ingredients combined with the nuts, which will harmonize with them, and not use such a large proportion of nuts.” CDF  364

“With nuts may be combined grains, fruits, and some roots, to make foods that are healthful and nourishing. Care should be taken, however, not to use too large a proportion of nuts.” CDF  363

None of these statements indicate that a large amount of protein is needed. The high protein foods mentioned are the nuts which we are instructed to mix with other foods so that the nut content will be small. They also indicate that the protein supply may be obtained wholly from the vegetable kingdom. Therefore, the plant-based diet, high in alkaline foods, calls for a minimum of protein, 40 to 60 grams, and constitutes the ideal diet.

We need to remember that excess protein cannot be stored, and is not as readily converted into heat and energy as are other foods and consequently must be excreted by the kidneys, and is counted as one cause of injury to those organs. It has been shown that an excess of vegetable protein is not as injurious as the same excess of animal protein.


Questions:

1.  How can an excess amount of protein be injurious, especially when eating meat and animal products?

2. Why do people who eat a plant-based diet need less protein, than those who eat animal foods?

3. How can excess protein affect the kidneys?

4. What foods contain all the elements of nutrition?

5. What foods combine well with nuts?

6. What can parents do to help their family embrace a plant based diet?

7. Is it your desire to follow God’s plan in securing a small home in the country with land to grow your own food? Please take time, right now, and pray a special prayer to God, that He would guide you to your special place.


SPECIAL RESOURCE!

 

One special resource that could assist you on your journey, is the following book,  Your Home In The Country. This practical guide and handbook is available in our end-time store- for only $3! Click here.

 

 

 


Grab a friend and share the wealth, from what you’ve learned in the School of Health! In next week’s class, we shall look at some examples of meals with average protein ration for the day of from 40 to 60 grams. In addition, we shall look more into why meat is not necessary. Until then!

Previous Lesson: Part 1

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