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How The Body Uses Food-Part 4

During the first part of Solomon’s reign, “In the mineral…world…he saw a revelation of God’s wisdom; and as he sought to learn more and more, his knowledge of God and his love for Him increased.” {PK 33} In like manner, as we go deeper into the mineral segment of our study, let us look for revelations of God’s wisdom and love!

 

 

 

The Blood Serum

Here is the analysis of the blood serum as made by Cavazzani, calculated on 100 parts of fluid:

Potassium oxide………………………………………….0.387 Sodium oxide………………………………………………4.290

Chlorine………………………………………………………3.565 Calcium oxide………………………………………………0.155

Magnesium oxide………………………………………..0.101

There are five to six quarts of this liquid in the body and every drop requires all these minerals in these proportions.

The Red Blood Cell

And here is the same for the red cell of the blood as analyzed by S.Schmidt, calculated on 100 parts of the moist substance of the corpuscles:

Potassium chloride………………………………………….3.68 Sodium chloride……………………………………………Traces

Potassium phosphate………………………………………2.34 Sodium phosphate…………………………………………..0.63

Calcium phosphate…………………………………………..0.09 Magnesium phosphate……………………………………..0.06

Iron oxide…………………………………………………………0.47 Potassium sulphate………………………………………….0.13

These mineral salts must be supplied in the food. They are automatically contained in a balanced ration of natural foods.

The Importance of Iron

Iron is a part of the structure of every body cell. It is also the chief mineral constituent of the hemoglobin of the red blood corpuscle which carries oxygen from the lungs to all body cells. When iron is deficient the body cannot be fully supplied with oxygen and then the “fires” of the body will diminish and the body will be lacking in heat and energy. In this way a deficiency of iron contributes to anemia. Iron also seems to help in the use of oxygen in the body as well as in its transportation. The body’s natural source of iron is in natural foods. When a balanced ration is employed, a normal amount of iron is automatically secured.

The Lymph

The chemical analysis of lymph, according to Bodansky’s “Introduction to Physiological Chemistry,” page 243, is as follow:

Water…………………………………………………………..93.99 Solids……………………………………………………………..6.01

Fibrin……………………………………………………………… .05 Other proteins………………………………………………..4.27

Fat, cholesterol, lecithin………………………………….. .38 Extractive bodies……………………………………………. .57

Salts………………………………………………………………. .73

The lymph is the fluid which separates from the blood and is the medium of interchange of food supplies from the blood to the body cells, and of the cell wastes back to the blood for elimination. To do its work it is dependent upon these mineral salts, which must be supplied in the daily rations.

Metabolism and Iodine

The rate of metabolism is set by the thyroid gland, which depends upon iodine to regulate this function. Although the quantity needed is very minute, it is necessary to health and life. Only one part in three million of the body by weight is iodine, and yet it is essential to life–to the function of the thyroid gland. A person needs only 5 milligrams in a year. When there is a deficiency of iodine the thyroid gland enlarges. Other deficiency results may be poor quality of skin, hair, and nails, and faulty use of fats and calcium.

Muscular Movements

The contraction and relaxation of muscles (all muscular movements), depend upon the presence of calcium, sodium, and potassium in correct proportions. As an example: With a deficiency of sodium and potassium and an excess of calcium, the heart muscles may “go into rigor”–remain contracted and refuse to relax. Contrariwise, if there be an excess of sodium and potassium and a deficiency of calcium, the muscle may relax and refuse to function. When these minerals are in correct balance they interact upon the muscle cells in such a way as to bring about “alternate contraction and relaxation,” and so maintain the normal rhythm of the heartbeat. The correct balance of these minerals will automatically be obtained from a balanced ration, that the individual need never give thought to the beating of the heart.

Putrefaction

Minerals influence the preservation of all tissue from disorganization and putrefaction.

Nerves

Minerals are an important part of nerve cells. When there is a deficiency of them in the nerve cells, the nerves become irritable, and nervousness and nervous diseases develop.

Teeth and Bones

Minerals constitute a large part of the teeth and bones, and are continually needed to maintain these parts of the anatomy. They are needed in much larges amounts by growing children than by adults.

Phosphorus

Phosphorus is necessary to the normal function of the brain and nerves. It is used in teeth and bones. It forms a part of every cell of the body. It is necessary to the vigor of the white blood cells which are the “soldiers” of the body, destroying enemy germs.

Osmosis

Minerals are a factor in the regulation of “osmosis,” a word signifying the passing of fluids through permeable membrane. This is the process by which the lungs pass oxygen into the blood and receive wastes from the blood; by which food passes from the digestive tract into the blood, and by which every cell in the body receives its fresh supplies and sends out its waste products.

The Glands

Some of the most important and mysterious parts of the body are the various glands. These select their required substances from which they synthesize new compounds. Upon the work of these secretions which the glands send forth into they body depend digestion, absorption and utilization of all foods elements, and the very existence of cells. No physiological or mental activity is possible without them. In their absence the body and its activities would cease to be. Manifestly the glands cannot pick their required elements from the blood unless their progenitors were previously taken in the foods eaten.

It is impossible to describe and number the intricate processes of life in which mineral salts are a factor. Their work is fast becoming one of the wonders of modern science. Their importance is only beginning to be understood. Manifestly if they are continuously deficient in the body abnormal conditions must arise which will be known as “diseseas.”

Calcium and Tuberculosis

An interesting example of how minerals protect from disease is seen in the case of tuberculosis of the lungs. Nature calls on the blood for calcium and builds a calcium deposit around the germ, walling it off and preventing its activity and ultimately causing its death, and the person’s life is saved because the blood had plenty of calcium. But we take two-thirds of the calcium out of the “staff of life”–throw away one of our defenses against tuberculosis and then wonder why we and our children suffer with it. Space does not permit us to give other details of how minerals protect from disease. Nonetheless, we can consider what we have looked into today and talk with God about it. Isn’t He such a wise and loving God? Truly, we are fearfully and wonderfully made! Join us next week Wednesday as we go deeper yet.

 

*Study adapted from the book, Abundant Health by Julius G. White